Kendall Jenner traumatized over Pepsi ad backlash

Posted April 13, 2017

With a clear divide between the protesters and the police, Jenner storms through the crowd, swiftly picks up a Pepsi can and hands it to a stern looking officer who can't help but smile with 12 ounces of carbonated liquid gold in his hand.

After last week's Kendall Jenner Pepsi ad debacle, a production company has chose to take matters into its own hands and tell the real story of political protests.

Pepsi pulled the ad a day later following a public outcry it was trivializing civil rights and protest movements to sell a soft drink.

For what it's worth, Pepsi ended up pulling the original ad less than 24 hours after its debut. In fact, Madonna herself was the victim of Pepsi pulling a 1989 commercial featuring the "Material Girl" singer almost 30 years ago after the controversy surrounding the "Like A Prayer" music video.

Moments earlier, Madonna shared another post featuring the Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, describing the clip as "sh*t", and wrote a side note along with it. To get a Pepsi gig was a big deal. Near the end of the ad, the Pepsi logo flashes across the screen alongside the words "Water Is Life". By some estimations, the commercial was seen by 250 million viewers in more than 40 countries, according to People magazine.

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Nyanzi is within her constitutional rights and we are for an all-out legal battle with the state to defend her rights". Ultimately, she was sent to Luzira until April 25 when Chief Magistrate Mawanda promised to rule on the matter. "Dr.

Kendall Jenner is laying low after her recent Pepsi ad controversy.

The production company ThirtyRev wanted to teach Pepsi how to make a protest video.

"Kendall is still not happy about the controversy", a source told PEOPLE. The law enforcer opened the top, took a gulp and is welcomed by the unusual yells of regard from the protesters.

One of the actors in the commercial told People most of the extras in the ad weren't even from the USA, and had no idea about the significance of its message.