Palestinian force deploys in Lebanon camp, ending clashes

Posted April 13, 2017

Palestinian factions battled an extremist group in a refugee camp in southern Lebanon on Saturday in a second day of clashes that have killed at least two people, medics said. The camp's radical groups have regularly fallen afoul of Palestinian security forces for hiding fugitives from the Lebanese law.

Fighting broke out after the security force sought to deploy throughout the camp and met resistance from the Badr group.

Wednesday, an exchange of fire erupted in the camp was set to delay the deployment of the joint force.

Gunmen loyal to Badr agreed to leave the area before the joint force moved in.

Ein el-Hilweh, which like the other camps falls outside the jurisdiction of the Lebanese security services, has been plagued in recent months by deadly clashes between the various armed groups operating there.

The official National News Agency reported that leaders of the camp's political groups were scheduled to meet to discuss the clashes.

The fighting prompted the Lebanese army to close the highway next to the entrance to the camp and Lebanon's health ministry to evacuate patients from the nearby government hospital.

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Salah al-Ali, a resident of the camp, said there was damage from shelling inside the camp.

"We ask from God that the situation calms down so that we can return to our homes", he said from Sidon's Musally mosque, where he was taking shelter.

"Only Israel benefits from the ongoing sedition. and on top of the events is Ain al-Hilweh clashes", Berri said.

Palestinians in Lebanon are prohibited from working in professional jobs and have few legal protections. They are prohibited from owning property as well.

The United Nations says some 55,000 people live in Ein El Hilweh.

Many people wanted by the Lebanese authorities are believed to have taken refuge in the camp.