Theresa May to 'reflect' after losing majority in Parliament

Posted June 19, 2017

British Prime Minister Theresa May faces a slew of criticism after a failed election campaign left her short of a parliamentary majority and fighting for survival as the clock ticks down to the start of Brexit talks. It was marked by a proposal to force elderly people to pay more for their care and her decision to skip a televised debate.

Britain's best-selling Sun newspaper said senior members of her party had vowed to get rid of May but would wait at least six months because they were anxious that a leadership contest now could propel Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn into power.

Damian Green, a lawmaker in the pro-EU wing of the party, was promoted to first secretary of state - effectively deputy prime minister. But after meeting with the queen, Theresa May insisted she will carry on.

Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission, said he was also ready to start talks and hoped the United Kingdom general election would not have an impact.

The objective of calling elections, having assured that there would be no election before the schedule one in 2020, after she took over as the party leader a year ago, Theresa May had hoped to strengthen her party's grip on power to be able to successfully negotiate Britain's exit from the EU. But, instead, support for her party declined dramatically, leaving her government far more precarious than before. She said it would help her in negotiating Britain's exit from the European Union.

Former Conservative minister Anna Soubry added that the premier "is in a very hard place. she now has to obviously consider her position".

Some senior Tories had made the removal of Hill and Timothy a condition for continuing to support May, who has vowed to remain prime minister despite the Conservatives losing their overall majority in Parliament.

Asked if she is now just a caretaker leader, May noted that "I said during the election campaign that if elected I would intend to serve a full term".

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May said Brexit talks would begin on June 19 as scheduled, the same day the British parliament is due to reconvene. Nobody expects her to lead the Conservatives into the next general election and most predict she will be gone within months. "Do your best to avoid a no deal as result of no negotiations". Our negotiations with the European Union will be stifled by parliamentary and legal challenges every single inch of the way, wasting untold time and money.

May has said she favors a "hard" Brexit. It's all their Christmases rolled into one and they will make sure they leverage as much as they can from their advantage.

May, who took over after the June 2016 Brexit referendum, began the formal two-year process of leaving the European Union on March 29, promising to take Britain out of the single market and cut immigration. There were also shock results in Scotland. "Let's get on with the job", he said.

Jeremy Corbyn was pictured joining a children's football training session in Islington as one of his MPs said Labour missed an "open goal" to beat Theresa May and the Tories in the General Election.

The Conservatives lost their parliamentary majority in Thursday's election.

"The irony of this is that Theresa May is calling this a certainty government and talking about how it's delivering certainty", said Brian Klaas, a fellow in comparative politics at the London School of Economics.

"We are ready. We have completed the guidelines, the framework", Merkel said Friday in Mexico City.